Windsor has a long and colourful history. Thanks to the royal connection there are lots of first hand documentary sources available for those interested in the history of the town of Windsor, Berkshire.

The story of the settlement begins in the dawn of prehistory. The last ice age saw glaciers within 20 miles of where Windsor now stands. As the ice melted, the massive quantities of water carved the path of the river Thames

The river provided the first easy path through the growing forests so we believe that many settlers would have passed the bluff where the castle now stands while heading west into unknown lands. Evidence of Deer, Horses, Mammoth and Rhinoceros all point to plenty of hunting opportunities for the first peoples to arive after the ice retreated. A mammoth tusk can be found in the Windsor Museum.

For the next eight thousand years or so, hunter gatherers and later on, farmers left their mark on the landscape. The thames valley is awash with flint tools and the evidence of their manufacture. For instance, this mesolithic blade was one of hundreds found on just one morning of fieldwalking further west along the thames valley.

In the bronze age there were wooden bridges over the thames about a mile upstream from Windsor where the Eton rowing lake now sits.  The excavation of the lake revealed the remains of three round barrows which have long since been flattened by ploughing.

In the Iron age we believe that Windsor marked the eastern edge of the Atrebates tribal boundary. There is little evidence of Roman occupation (55AD to 410AD) in Windsor. However a settlement grew to the west of the great rock and the village of Clewer evolved. There was a ferry here, but no evidence of a bridge. The name Clewer may well have Roman origin. The nearest Roman Road was that which ran between Calleva (Silchester) and Londinium (London). Its course included a river crossing at Staines about 5 miles downstream. This does not mean Windsor was ignored by the Romans. Archaeology in town has revelaved a number of finds from the Roman period.

During the Saxon period (500-1000AD) a royal palace grew up at Windlesora (meaning windlass on the riverbank) a mile and a half downstream from the present town of Windsor. The village there is called Old Windsor though nothing of the Saxon palace remains.

In 1066 William of Normandy successfully invaded and was crowned King at Westminster Abbey on Christmas Day. Within a few years a basic wood and earth fortress had been built overlooking the Thames where Windsor Castle now stands.

By 1100 A small town had grown around the castle and in 1121 the first of many royal weddings to be held in Windsor occured.

Between 1173-79 the stone walls replaced William the Conqueror’s wooden palisades and earthworks and the castle we know today began to appear.

Windsor Castle was besieged in 1193 for 2 months by barons who were opposing Prince John’s attempted coup. Some years later John became king and just a few months after signing the Magna Carta at Runnymede, he was again besieged at Windsor by the barons, this time for 3 months.

History tells us that in 1236 five oak trees were required to repair the wooden bridge at Windsor. This bridge lasted until 1822 when it was replaced by the present cast iron structure.

In 1277 Windsor was granted a charter which allowed the local merchants form a guild .

In the mid fourteenth century plague struck the country at a time when Edward III was busy rebuilding much of the castle at Windsor. The workers suffered greatly and in 1362 writs were issued to find an additional 302 masons and stonediggers to replace those who had died from the black death.

During the reign of Henry VI (crowned in 1422AD) Eton college was founded, altering for all time the view north across the river.

Windsor’s Coat of Arms

The Three Tuns pub, behind the Guildhall, was built in 1518. The reign of Hentry VIII also saw a new gatehouse built at the castle entrance. If you look at the crest above the gate you will see Henry’s Tudor rose and the Pomegranate which was the symbol of his first wife, Katherine of Aragon.

By 1528 there were 20 alehouses in Windsor, a town with a population of barely 1000 people. The Mermaid alehouse stood on the site of the current Castle Hotel. A few yards down the hill stood the Garter alehouse mentioned by Shakespeare in the Merry Wives of Windsor. A pub (Ye Harte and Garter) still stands on the spot today. We have lots of listed buildings in Windsor which are meant to be protected for future generations.

In 1563 Queen Elizabeth I fled london because of bubonic plague running rife in the city. She came to Windsor and according to “A History of Bubonic Plague in the British Isles” By J. F. D. Shrewsbury, she set up a gallows in the market square on which to hang anyone coming there from London.

In the same book it is reported that there was a rumor of plague at Windsor in September 1606, but the townsfolk were quick to deny it. However, there was a record of the plague in Eton at this time although no details are given.

When Windsorians weren’t busy diying of plague, they spent their time being pretty horrible to each other. It is a tragic fact that young John Dean of Windsor aged only 8 or 9 years old was the youngest recorded child ever to be hanged in England. On 23rd February 1629 he was tried and found guilty of burning down two houses in the town.

During the plague of 1665 when there were ‘not enough people to bury the dead’, the cellar of a house in Eton was used as a temporary mortuary. The building is still standing and is now the Waterman’s Arms public house.

In 1673 the first stagecoach service from Windsor to London began.

In 1687 Windsor’s lovely Guildhall was erected. The guidhall was designed by Sir Thomas Fiddes and constructed by Sir Christopher Wren, who was later to become England’s most famous architect.

Nell Gwynne actress and mistress of King Charles II lived in Windsor and her house stands to this day.

In the early 1700s Windsor was fashionable and the Ascot races were founded. However all this changes in 1714 when George I comes to the throne. The Hannoverians were not big fans of Windsor until George III moves here in late 1700s.

In the 1820s the castle is extensively remodelled by Sir Jeffry Wyattville at the command of The Prince Regent (George IV).

1840 Queen Victoria’s beloved husband Albert errects England’s first xmas tree at Windsor Castle. The Royal family are illustrated in a newspaper standing around the Christmas tree, and the tradition of decorating a tree comes to stay.

Albert is also responsible for the roof of the curfew tower which was remodelled in a french style.

The coming of the railway changes the town and Park Street is closed off in exchange for the crown handing over part of the home park to the ralway company. At Windsor and Eton riverside station you can see the high doorways that allowed the mounted troopers to ride their horses on and off the special military trains without dismounting.

In 1881 “Pictures and Portraits of Foreign Travel” By Annie S. Wolf spoke of sitting in a boat on the river and looking towards Windsor Castle with its “famous old beeches with outstretched arms and gnarled trunks”.

2nd March 1882 Roderick Maclean fired a pistol at Queen Victoria as her carriage was leaving Windsor and Eton Riverside railway station. The Queen was unharmed and the would be assassin was arrested. He was later declared “not guilty, but insane” and was sent to Broadmoor Asylum where he died in 1921.

1909 Windsor Theatre destroyed by fire.

In 1911 Gustav hamel flew the world’s first airpost service between the long walk in Windsor and Hendon airfield in north London. The trip took just 20 minutes.

world's first airpost service

World War I Canadian Lumberjacks are billeted in the great park and chop down some of Windsor’s 1000 year old Oak trees.

The royal family change their name from Saxe-Coburg-Gotha to Windsor in 1917 so as to fit more closely with the national anti-german sentiment..

During the second World War, high explosive bombs and V1 and V2 missiles fell on the town. A crater caused by a bomb dropped on 24th October 1940 at 5.30am can still be seen at the corner of Clarence Crescent and Clarence Road.

At the old fire station (now an arts centre) on Peascod Street you can see anti-gas ventilators, installed by Windsor Borough Council in 1939 at the outbreak of WWII.

On September 30th 1940 Oberleutenant Karl Fischer of Jagdgeschwader 27 was flying his Messerschmitt 109 on a bomber escort mission to London. After being hit in the radiator and fuel tank he attempted to land in Windsor great park.

Messerschmitt 109 fighter crash landed in Windsor
Messerschmitt 109 fighter crash landed in Windsor

The plane overturned and was later righted, and put on display at the top of the long walk. Locals paid sixpence a time to view the plane and the money raised went to the local Hurricane Fighter Fund.

ME109 on display to public in St Alban's Street

Coincidentally, the designer of the Hawker Hurricane was Sidney Camm who himself had been born in Windsor.

A bomb fell in Vansittart Road close to Maidenhead Road killing local resident Bill Wing who was riding his bicycle when the bomb fell

Windsor’s population trebled during the twentieth Century. Slum dwellings close to the town centre were replaced by a massive block of flats called Ward Royal, now considered by many to be the second ugliest buildings in Windsor. Not all history was lost when they built the estate however, A little way along the pathway by the boundary wall on the southern side of the Ward Royal housing estate you can see the remains of the end walls of air raid shelters. A plaque marks the spot where Sidney Camm (together with his brothers) built a full size glider at the age of 19 years old.

In 1970 the bridge joining Windsor and Eton was closed to vehicles and has remained a pedestrian bridge ever since.

A massive Fire breaks out at Windsor Castle on 20 November 1992 the 45th wedding anniversary of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh. Over 100 rooms in the Castle were badly damaged or destroyed. The fire took 250 firefighters some 15 hours to extinguish. After five years of rennovation work coting £37 million Windsor castle reopens to visitors.

In 2007 Windsor was recorded as the 19th most expenive place to live in England.

The Windsor Triathlon attracted record crowds in June.

In 2009 for the 4th year running a 200 ft Ferris Wheel sits on Alexandra Park during the summer to afford visitors an elevated view of the town.

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2012 the Olympic Games came to town, with Eton Dorney rowing lake staging canoe sprint and rowing events. A temporary bridge across the Thames and  20,000 additional seats were needed for spectators.

In October 2012 Windsor appointed its first official Town Crier in more than a Century when Chris Brown was offered the role.

Saturday 14 September 2013 a series of Willow Arches were installed at the Castle End of The Long Walk to celebrate the Queen’s Jubilee.

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